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20121205
20121213
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
blow in their own backyard. >>> a new movie has controversy surrounding around the cia analyst credited with finding osama bin laden and a sex abuse verdict topples the wall of secrecy that surrounded an ultraorthodox jewish sect. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> first this just coming into cnn. word that michigan's governor has just signed a law that many believe will significantly weaken union power in the state. one of the organized labor movements few remaining strongho strongholds. there was massive protests as lawmakers approved a so-called right to work law which allows members to forego paying dues. poppy harlow is in lansing in the state capital for us. you just spoke to the governor about all of this. what did he tell you? >> reporter: well, i spoke with the governor just ahead of that announcement where he confirmed that he indeed did sign this legislation into lawmaking michigan a right to work state. a sea change for this state, wolf. the governor saying this is a "opportunity" to stand up for workers and flying in the face of what many of those workers
scenes of a cia officer interrogating a detainee. other abuse and torture is shown in detail, leaving in doubt does it go to too far and is it accue in the interrogation and torture techniques in the hunt for osama bin laden and finding osama bin laden. peter bergen was an unofficial adviser in the him. his new book is "man hunt." he joins me now with former cia officer bob behr. you have seen the movie, i have seen it as well. you were an an paid adviser. what did they get wrong? there was a lot of reporter the screen writer did to kind of suss out the facts. in terms of the torture sequence were that right in that waterboarding led to the information that led to bin laden. >> not according to the senate intelligence committee. the film is a great film and it covers a lot of themes about the war on terror and the decade-long struggle against al qaeda. as a sort of overall picture, there's a lot of things that are good about the film. but the fact that is senate intelligence committee which has spint three years investigating the claim that coercive techniques led to bin laden amongst
with cnn contributor and former cia officer bob baer and on the phone fran townsend. barbara, i know you're working to confirm this nbc report. how much would this change the situation? if u.s. military is going to act to prevent assad from gassing his own people, it would seem, if they loaded this stuff into weapons, the time to do it would be at hand. >> right now i can tell you, anderson, if this turns out to be true, even if not, the u.s. military, the cia in a full-blown effort to collect every piece of intelligence they can about what is going on with the chemical weapons and develop a targeting strategy if it were to come to that. so, what are we talking about here, anderson? they have to put together targeting options for the president. that involves the latest intelligence. where are the chemical weapons in syria? what would you do to attack them? what kind of u.s. bomber aircraft would you use? do you know precisely where they are? how would you get it past air defenses? israel, turkey, jordan, neighboring countries, their intelligence services also working this problem around
wire is a sports analyst. chad sweet is a former cia director of operations. and ken baer is a white housed a virus. todd carmichael is the host of dangerous grounds. howard kurtz will join us. and economic diane swonk rounds things out for us today. "starting point" begins right now. >>> good morning. welcome, everybody. let's begin with developing news this morning. a tsunami threat to tell you about was just lifted in japan. the country was rocked by a powerful 7.3 magnitude earthquake. it hit off the coast of tokyo. the buildings there shaking. you could see some of the video showing the degree to which they were shaking. alex, what's the latest? >> reporter: it has been a very, very tense few hours here in japan after you mentioned a 7.3 magnitude earthquake striking late here in the day on friday. but just in the past 90 minutes or so, the all clear has been given. the tsunami warning has been lifted. that's great news for the people here. there's no signs of any significant damage. no reports of any deaths. just a few injuries at this point. we also have to keep in mind the nu
to mexico. >>> now for the complicated life of a cia official who tracked down osama bin laden. there's a reported backlash. according to the washington post the undercover operative who tracked osama bin laden has been passed over for a promotion. the newspaper reports that she sent e-mails to colleagues saying they didn't deserve to share any credit and she is being investigated for her contact with the film makers. >>> from the battle inside the cia to the seemingly never ending battle over obesity. after 30 years of children getting fatter obesity rates are starting to go down. big cities like new york and nebraska reported small drops in childhood obesity rates. that is according to the robert wood johnson foundation. experts say it is the first sign that childhood obesity can be reversing. the 2012 america's health rankings find americans are living longer thanks to medical is hoping a multi-year deal with beyonce estimated to be worth $50 million, you could buy a lot of baby cloefts, her face will be found on limited edition pepsi cans starting early next year. is it just me or
for osama bin laden "zero dark 30." this year of the cia agent a little more complicated than the hollywood spy version portrayal. the post says she was actually passed over for a poe motion shortly after the mission that killed bin laden. also it says she took heat for ties to filmmakers and there was jealousy over her fame and that led to internal friction within the agency. the post says after being given a prestigious award for her work this agent sent an e-mail to dozens of others saying they didn't deserve to share in the accolades. >> not good. >> not getting along very well inside the cia, apparently. >> in the a smart move either. >>> for an expanded look at all of our top stories, head to cnn.com/earlystart. also follow us on twitter and on facebook. just search for early start cnn. >> it's made of steel but it's not a steal by any means. the gift card craze that has some coffee lovers paying way more than face value. look! over time, cascade complete pacs fight film buildup two times better than finish quantum to help leave glasses sparkling. cascade. the clear choice. but when i
was -- after he won the election, and that is that the cia program, whether you find it repugnant or not, actually was effective with ksm and other people getting actionable intelligence that led to couriers that led eventually years later to the killing of osama bin laden. >> joe and mika, i saw a screening of the film on friday, and then i had breakfast on saturday with the screenwriter. it is powerful precisely because it just walks you through the story of what happened. and you can make all of the moral and political arguments that you want about what our policy on torture should be. this just tells you the story of what happened. there's no question in the record that the film shows and in other research that i've done that the name of the courier who led us to bin laden's hideout in abbottabad emerged in these harsh interrogations. and there's a weird way in watching this film in which every viewer will feel complicit in that process in a weird way. you're watching, hoping that they get the name, hoping that somehow you get enough information for the united states to act. it's a r
spoke with cnn contributor, former cia officer bob baer and dr. sanjay gupta. we talked about this last night, but explain again what one warhead filled with sarin could do. >> one of these shells and the standard shell the syrians put this in is a 122 millimeter shell, a standard artillery piece. if they were to drop this into a dense area, into damascus or a suburb of homs, it doesn't matter which town, it will instantly kill 18,000 within the first few minutes. >> from one shell? >> one single shell would immediately kill 18,000 people. you know, this is a liquid. it's dispersed. it sticks on you. you get a few -- a little bit in your system, and you're dead. >> sanjay, what does it do to somebody who comes in contact with it? >> it affects receptors in the brain, and let me preface it by saying it's odorless and tasteless and it's colorless. it's hard to even know, you know, that it's there because of those things. also by touching it as bob was talking about, but also by inhaling it or eating food or drinking water contaminated with it, you can also get poisoned. you see this is a
the legacy of all of the bureaucrat particular power. >> former cia official says in recent month kim has purging 200 top officials, including powerful generals who had been loyal to his father. >> generals that are being elevated indeed are a bit more hardcore, hardlined than the generals that were originally in place. so if anything it's an indication that north korea is not going to be any more reform-minded under kim jong-unthan his spread says fors. >> in fact, he's a hardliner who got his fingerprints on the 2010 warship by north korea and the shelling of a disputedisland which killed four south koreans, wolf. he's kwn as a pretty bellicose general. >> people are worried about it right now. let's say they develop a missile with a warhead potentially capable of reaching the united states. what are the u.s. capabilities in terms of defending itself against such a missile? >> leon panetta said that the u.s. is very confident if north korea were to launch a missile at the united states, the american military could guard against it. that's a major reason why they are bolstering their pre
, secretary of state, secretary of defense, cia director. he wants to unveil it all at the same time, a new national security team. >> thank you, jake. >>> now to the second straight sunday, tragedy overshadowing an nfl game. the dallas cowboys taking the field with heavy hearts the day after player died in a horrific car crash caused by his teammate driving drunk. john schriffen has the story. >> reporter: a silent josh brent walked out of jail. he's charged with intoxication manslaughter in the death of his dallas cowboys teammate and roommate, jerry brown jr. >> he said my best friend died. you can't get tirgt than those two. >> reporter: the car they were in hit a curb, flipped and kaugtd fire, killing brown. brent admitted to drinking at a club that evening and smelled of alcohol. an emotion gnat cowboys team beat the cincinnati bengals. teammates holing up brown's jersey after the game. >> football is very different than life. we lost a 25-year-old young man who had his whole life in front of him. >> reporter: his death is the second in the nfl in as many weeks. on december 1st, polic
of terrorist ties. phillip mudd, a former cia and fbi counterterrorism official, says there's a huge concern over who to trust with chemical weapons. >> when you've got roughly 10% of the opposition in the. >>>s u.s. government is declaring are terrorist group you're going to be concerned. in any case like this, there's a lot of risk. >> reporter: but mudd says it's still better to train the rebels on how to handle those materials than to do nothing. and leonard specter says the u.s. and its allies are likely screening the individuals who are being trained very carefully, wofrl, at least that's the hope. >> despite all that, there's still a potential for these chemical weapons getting into the wrong hands. despite what the u.s. is trying to do. >> reporter: phillip mudd says if the syrian regime loses control of these weapons, that's a huge worry. if they fall into the hands of others who are not trusted by the u.s. or its allies they could float around the border to iraq or other potentially dangerous places where they don't have control over these things. if assad loses control of these th
, last night, a former cia officer, robert bear, was speaking to anderson cooper. he described what the use of sarin could do. here's more of what he had to say. >> one round and the dispersion on that could be -- depends on the wind -- but you could take out, let's say a city like homs, you could take out a third of the city in the first couple of hours. anderson, this is a highly toxic liquid. it's a persistent agent. it's absolutely completely deadly. >> reporter: now, we've heard repeatedly from u.s. administration officials, u.s. president barack obama, u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton that the use of chemical weapons in syria was a red line for which syria and the bashar al assad regime would face severe consequences if they ever did cross that red line and utilize chemical weapons against the people of syria. >> and we have no idea what those severe consequences would be, right? >> reporter: that's right, we don't. you know, people speculate that this would mean some type of military intervention, but we also know that a lot of world powers have not wanted to intervene
to the cia and department of homeland security. general marks, let me start with you. what are the military options at this stage right now? realistically, what could the use, nato, the international community militarily do if there is an indication that the syrian military's about to use chemical weapons against its own people. >> wolf, that's the key point. in advance of its use what can the u.s. do? and it's clearly having a very robust, very broad intelligence collection apparatus that takes into account all means of collection, technical as well as human intelligence. there are known sites where the chemical weapons are stockpiled, where the production sites are. then there has to be an act to marry those up with the distribution or delivery means. >> a missile. >> a missile, artillery shell, put into a bomb then uploaded under the wings of an aircraft. all those are indicators of what might occur. intelligence has to be very, very robust in order to go after that. then, if it is such that we see that happening in a tactical sense, in other words, there's not much time to respond, we h
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)